Notes

News, links, research, and product announcements from XOXCO in Austin, TX.

  1. Where do old posts go when they die?

    Where do old posts go when they die?

    This post originally appeared as part of XOXCO Dispatch #1. Sign up now to be among the first to read our posts.

    It is amazing how much content is poured onto the web every day. Just yesterday, our friends over at Pando Daily posted nearly 9,000 words of original writing on their site in form of 14 essays. The homepage holds only 16 posts, which means that some time this weekend, all 9,000 of those words will, as far as most people are concerned, disappear from the space-time continuum.

    The articles in your city’s weekly paper are allowed to live for a week. Magazines sit on the shelf for a month. But the things we create for the web content get one shot, 24 or maybe 48 hours on the front page before disappearing into the archives. Surely, in this age of unlimited, flawless reproduction, we can do better than leaving the things we create to crawl slowly backwards towards infinity, away from anyone who might care.

    A site that publishes as much as Pando Daily does creates almost a novel’s worth of content every two weeks. Yet rarely do we spend the time to pause and look back at what we’ve got once the initial flourish of chart beats end. Are we missing something?

    The second page of XOXCO’s blog gets just 3% as many hits as the first.

    Our visitors are left to search or crawl backwards themselves, and our editors don’t have the tools to curate and repurpose the content they already own. How can we look back if there is only the stream?

    This is one of the reasons why we created Packagr. We want to help publishers tap into their content archives and give some of the best stuff a second chance to shine - perhaps in a different format or venue, perhaps to a new audience. After all, who doesn’t like a good rerun?

    The future we’re hoping to build through Packagr is filled with short, interesting ebooks containing essays and reporting pulled from blog archives a decade long. We’re hoping to help a million iPad zinesters get their short stories and magazine articles on the virtual shelves. We want to help digital publishers continue the long tradition of creating distinct artifacts of their time, to take the important things out of the stream and put them in context, their proper place in space-time.

    And then we’ll sell ten thousand copies of those artifacts for $3 each.

    We’re looking for publishers who want to build this future with us. You can be one of the first.

    posted 1 year ago on Apr 2, 2013 | Permalink | 6 notes

  2. Tumblr Notes

    1. theream reblogged this from benbrown and added:
      The new animation is way cuuuute! Also makes me want a website that burns me a CD of all the sad, old, dead posts;...
    2. benbrown reblogged this from xoxco and added:
      This post originally appeared as part of XOXCO Dispatch #1. Sign up now to be among the first to read our posts. It is...
    3. xoxco posted this

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