Notes

News, links, research, and product announcements from XOXCO in Austin, TX.

  1. Posts tagged archives

  2. Last week, The Atlantic announced the launch of a new weekly publication that will combine content from the print magazine and several of The Atlantic’s web properties. This material will be published via a subscription-based iPad and iPhone application, and delivered on Friday afternoons.

    "We’re aiming to provide a selection of stories and ideas on screens scrubbed of all distractions, for those moments over the weekend when readers can pause to sit back and let their minds roam,” James Bennet, editor in chief of The Atlantic, said. “And for us, this is another experiment in putting to use any new means available to create and support the journalism of ideas that distinguishesThe Atlantic.”

    Today, TechCrunch announced the launch of CrunchBase Daily, a daily recap of fundraising activity in silicon valley. This daily broadcast publication is for people who want to make sure they get a comprehensive view of this fast based marketplace, but may not have the time to visit the CrunchBase site every day. TechCrunch will deliver this new publication via email and on their Twitter account.

    These are great examples of publishers repackaging and repurposing their content to reach different audiences and satisfy different needs, a process which multiplies the value of the content to both the publishers and their readers. They also provide an opportunity for these publishers to change the relationship they have with their readers - from casual passers by to long term subscribers.

     This is one of the primary ways we envision publishers using Packagr, and as luck would have it, we just published an updated description of what we call the “Weekly Edition” feature. Packagr publishers can create curated daily, weekly or monthly editions, then publish them as ebooks, emails, apps or back to the web. Take a look!

    posted 1 year ago on Jun 18, 2013 | Permalink | 1 note

  3. Watch Ben Brown’s talk on reader aware design, and building a valuable back catalog with the content in your website’s archives. This talk was originally presented at Austin’s Refresh meetup, and is now brought to you by Austin Tech Videos.

    View the slides for this presentation here.

    Read more about the concept of reader aware design or jump right in with our JavaScript tool, Aware.js.

    Need a way to better merchandise the content you are creating? Sign up for Packa.gr, our multi-platform, multi-format publishing tool that can turn content from your existing website into premium digital formats like ebooks and iOS apps.

    (Source: youtube.com)

    posted 1 year ago on May 9, 2013 | Permalink | 7 notes

  4. The slides from my recent talk at Refresh Austin about reader aware design and building better archives for web content are now online! View them here.

    The slides from my recent talk at Refresh Austin about reader aware design and building better archives for web content are now online! View them here.

    posted 1 year ago on Apr 25, 2013 | Permalink | 3 notes

  5. This video shows the slides for my hour long talk on reader aware design and building a back catalog, to be delivered at tonight’s Refresh Austin event, compressed down into 10 seconds.

    posted 1 year ago on Apr 9, 2013 | Permalink | 3 notes

  6. NTK (or Need to Know) was an email newsletter about the internet and technology culture that was published weekly from 1997 to 2004. (See Wikipedia). At the time, it was one of the best sources for news and insightful analysis of the rapidly evolving world of web publishing, startups, and geeky stuff.

    The newsletter shut down in 2006, but the publishers have every single issue stored in perfect condition in their digital archives. Now, in 2013, they’re relaunching NTK in its original form, each issue to be sent out 15 years to the week after initially being published.

    The archives of NTK give us an amazing view into what the cutting edge looked like at the dawn of the consumer web. Looking back at it, we can see how much has changed, and how much has stayed eerily the same. Take, for example, this excerpt from this week’s archival edition:

    On Wednesday, MICROSOFT announced their second preview release of INTERNET EXPLORER 4.0. Within minutes, Versace was dead.

    posted 1 year ago on Apr 3, 2013 | Permalink | 1 note

  7. Where do old posts go when they die?

    Where do old posts go when they die?

    This post originally appeared as part of XOXCO Dispatch #1. Sign up now to be among the first to read our posts.

    It is amazing how much content is poured onto the web every day. Just yesterday, our friends over at Pando Daily posted nearly 9,000 words of original writing on their site in form of 14 essays. The homepage holds only 16 posts, which means that some time this weekend, all 9,000 of those words will, as far as most people are concerned, disappear from the space-time continuum.

    The articles in your city’s weekly paper are allowed to live for a week. Magazines sit on the shelf for a month. But the things we create for the web content get one shot, 24 or maybe 48 hours on the front page before disappearing into the archives. Surely, in this age of unlimited, flawless reproduction, we can do better than leaving the things we create to crawl slowly backwards towards infinity, away from anyone who might care.

    A site that publishes as much as Pando Daily does creates almost a novel’s worth of content every two weeks. Yet rarely do we spend the time to pause and look back at what we’ve got once the initial flourish of chart beats end. Are we missing something?

    The second page of XOXCO’s blog gets just 3% as many hits as the first.

    Our visitors are left to search or crawl backwards themselves, and our editors don’t have the tools to curate and repurpose the content they already own. How can we look back if there is only the stream?

    This is one of the reasons why we created Packagr. We want to help publishers tap into their content archives and give some of the best stuff a second chance to shine - perhaps in a different format or venue, perhaps to a new audience. After all, who doesn’t like a good rerun?

    The future we’re hoping to build through Packagr is filled with short, interesting ebooks containing essays and reporting pulled from blog archives a decade long. We’re hoping to help a million iPad zinesters get their short stories and magazine articles on the virtual shelves. We want to help digital publishers continue the long tradition of creating distinct artifacts of their time, to take the important things out of the stream and put them in context, their proper place in space-time.

    And then we’ll sell ten thousand copies of those artifacts for $3 each.

    We’re looking for publishers who want to build this future with us. You can be one of the first.

    posted 1 year ago on Apr 2, 2013 | Permalink | 6 notes

  8. Thought Catalog has an interesting selection of short, cheap ebooks available, including several “Best Of” collections. All books are available from Amazon, Apple AND Barnes & Noble, most for $3.

    posted 1 year ago on Mar 25, 2013 | Permalink

  9. I spoke with Hamish McKenzie at Pando Daily about the opportunities and challenges that digital publishers face when considering their content archives:

    “We work with publishers all the time, and it kills me to see their archives just sitting there,” Brown says. XOXCO, for instance, designed the original website for literary Web publisher The Rumpus. Every day, thousands of readers come to the site for the first time but never read the stuff that was published in its early days. The publication has thousands of high-quality articles sitting in their database, which reaches back to 2009 and is just begging for a readership, Brown says. “To me that seems like a business opportunity.”

    Get in touch if you want to start taking advantage of that business opportunity. Read more about web archives here.

    posted 1 year ago on Mar 25, 2013 | Permalink | 10 notes

  10. ebookporn:

Guns in America collects the Post’s prize-winning reporting on gun control in America and offers it as an ebook for $2.99 making reading, researching, and quoting from the Post’s in depth reporting on this hot button issue easy, and convenient. But perhaps the most important thing this does is it creates a powerful long form document of what would otherwise been several dozen unlinked individual stories in the paper.  
eBooks are facilitating the combination of publishing, journalism, and history into a new context. Though still tentatively promoted on the Post’s website and in the paper itself, these types of products can become an important way for newspapers to remain relevant and give backlist life to their journalist’s hard work.

    ebookporn:

    Guns in America collects the Post’s prize-winning reporting on gun control in America and offers it as an ebook for $2.99 making reading, researching, and quoting from the Post’s in depth reporting on this hot button issue easy, and convenient. But perhaps the most important thing this does is it creates a powerful long form document of what would otherwise been several dozen unlinked individual stories in the paper.  

    eBooks are facilitating the combination of publishing, journalism, and history into a new context. Though still tentatively promoted on the Post’s website and in the paper itself, these types of products can become an important way for newspapers to remain relevant and give backlist life to their journalist’s hard work.

    posted 1 year ago on Mar 24, 2013 | Permalink | 3 notes

  11. Scott Berkun, author and essayist, has a great front end to his extensive 1400-post archive that highlights his best writing on certain subjects, and offers a curated ebook edition of the 30 “most provocative essays.”

    Can your visitors easily find and utilize your best content?

    posted 1 year ago on Mar 21, 2013 | Permalink | 2 notes

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